Skip to content

“Leadership of women at that higher level will give confidence to the vulnerable groups because those who understand their plight would be representing them”.

Sep 8, 2022
Robina Abuya is a climate change specialist and an expert on Climate Change adaptation, mitigation, environmental impact assessment, feasibility studies, REDD+, and carbon studies and financing and early action among other fields of climate change. She is a registered Lead Expert with the National Environment Management Authority and practicing member of the Environment Institute of Kenya.

Praveen Gupta: What got you interested in Climate Change?

Robina Abuya: I trained in climate change (MSc) from Heriot-Watt University, U.K. Beyond that, I have practiced for over 10 years in various capacities at different institutions in the listed thematic areas of climate change. I got interested in climate change during the late 2000’s when Africa and Kenya in particular were facing challenges due to rising impacts and risks of climate change. After completing my undergraduate studies in Biology, I registered for post-graduation in climate change. I was fortunate enough that the commonwealth identified me for sponsorship. During that time, there was no concrete syllabus and specific studies in climate change – especially on policy, adaptation and mitigation.

These roles sometimes put women at risk, but they have over time learnt to adapt and mitigate, so they have vast knowledge on traditional adaptation and even mitigation approaches which they can share with a larger audience.

PG: Don’t you think more women from Global South need to be inducted into global climate leadership, including the COP?

RA: Yes, more women from the Global South should be inducted into global climate leadership, because:

  1. Women form a high percentage of vulnerable groups, facing multiple vulnerabilities due to various circumstances and risks.
  2. They interact more with the natural systems and, therefore, any risks due to climate change impact them substantially.
  3. The various cultural set up and roles played by women in the communities they come from. These roles sometimes put women at risk, but they have over time learnt to adapt and mitigate, so they have vast knowledge on traditional adaptation and even mitigation approaches which they can share with a larger audience.
  4. Women’s voices need to be heard because they have first-hand experience and, therefore, applicable solutions to some of the risks posed by climate change.  
  5. Leadership of women at that higher level will give confidence to the vulnerable groups because those who understand their plight would be representing them.

PG: How do you think a more expansive role for women would make the desired difference to the Climate agenda?

RA: Women will be able to incorporate practical climate actions. With a visible leadership presence of women, this will give confidence to especially those at the grass-roots that their voices would be heard and incorporated into the various policy initiatives.

Women will be able to incorporate practical climate actions. With a visible leadership presence of women, this may give confidence to especially those at the grass-roots that their voices would be heard and incorporated into the various policy initiatives.

Not only would women be not looked at as a vulnerable population, but will be also recognised as a people that are able to offer solutions and contribute policy mechanisms. This will enable them to relate better with the policy decisions and translate the actions better at implementation level.

The expanded role of women will also mean that they are able to demand for better approaches, mechanisms, compensation etc.

PG: Do you expect to continue your Climate related passion in your new role at the Red Cross?

RA: Yes, my profession is in climate change and environment. I endeavor to continue pursuing this at various lengths and in my new role.

PG: Many thanks, Robina. My best wishes in all your endeavours.

From → Articles

Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: